Thursday, November 04, 2010

Orphan Sunday

November 7 is Orphan Sunday. The care of orphans, foster kids and adoption . . . . these are really sanctity of life issues, and therefore, issues of great concern to us as the people of God.

I'm looking forward to interviewing Jim & Kathy Smith, on Sunday, about their recent trip to an orphanage in Honduras.

To spur our thinking on these issues here are a couple of helpful resources. The first is a Wall Street Journal column entitled "Adoption Season for Evangelicals" that highlights the movement toward adoption that is happening across the evangelical landscape and our church.

It's a great, thought provoking article. . . . so good that I don't want to make you click. Here it is in its entirety . . .

The Wall Street Journal

Adoption Season for Evangelicals

A biblical mandate to help children, especially those in foster care.


By NAOMI S. RILEY

Last Saturday at Grace Chapel in Denver, Focus on the Family (in collaboration with the Colorado Department of Human Services) hosted an information session for parents interested in adopting children out of the foster-care system. More than 150 families were represented and 55 of those have already begun the process. It was a successful and fitting end for the summer of 2010, which turned into a season of adoption for evangelicals.

In May, megachurch pastor Rick Warren held a "civil forum" on the subject. An audience of 800 attended and thousands more watched the webcast from their homes. "Orphans and vulnerable children are not a cause," said Warren. "They are a biblical and social mandate we can't ignore. A country half the size of the U.S—that's how many orphans there are in the world. We're not talking about a small problem."

Adoption was the cover story of Christianity Today in July. It included a feature by Russell Moore, dean of the School of Theology at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, in which he described in heart-wrenching terms the circumstances of his own adoption of two brothers from a Russian orphanage.

Mr. Moore, the author of a book called "Adopted for Life: The Priority of Adoption for Christian Families and Churches," has become a sort of go-to person for evangelicals on the issue of adoption. In trying to explain why Christians have a particular duty to adopt, he told me that "every one of us who follows Christ was adopted into an already existing family."

Which is to say that unlike Judaism or Islam, faiths that one is born into, Christianity requires each member to have an individual relationship with Christ. And so, in that sense, it is as if each Christian is adopted.

Yet it is the efforts of Focus on the Family, a group which has previously been most known for its political involvement on issues like abortion and gay marriage, that have produced the most striking results so far. The group announced two years ago that it would be devoting a considerable amount of its resources to a new initiative called "Wait No More." Focus is partnering with different state governments—six so far—to reduce the number of children on foster-care roles.

In Colorado alone, Focus has moved about 500 of the 800 kids in foster care into permanent homes over the course of less than two years. The group has had success helping infertile couples desperate for families, but also in placing children with couples who are older, some of whose children have already grown up and left home.

The Focus efforts are particularly interesting because foster kids are typically not young, and often have emotional or even physical problems as a result of a lack of prenatal care, or neglectful birth or foster parents. Sometimes they can only be adopted with siblings, and so a family must take on two or more children at the same time.

Foster children are also likely to be of a different race from their new adoptive parents. As more and more evangelical churches take up the cause of adoption on a large scale, their congregations have begun to look like the multiracial sea of faces that Christian leaders often talk about wanting. But it does involve parents giving up on having children who look like them.

All of this makes the growing evangelical interest in adoption seem particularly countercultural. With the widespread availability of artificial reproductive technologies such as in-vitro fertilization, many couples who previously would have chosen adoption can now use surrogates, donor sperm or donor eggs to have a baby who shares their DNA (or whose DNA they have carefully chosen), and whose prenatal care they can closely monitor. Taking a child as he or she comes to you may be a difficult choice for some parents to make these days.

The contemporary cultural message that we can have complete control over our children goes beyond making sure our babies are healthy and our children are given good moral direction. We take yoga classes with our infants, we attach GPS devices to children's backpacks and we call our kids in college on a daily, if not hourly, basis. There is no doubt that the world can seem a more dangerous place, with too many other influences, particularly new media, trying to exert control over our children. Now that Americans are having fewer children, we fret more over each one, too.

But how much control can we have? A Christianity Today cover story earlier this year on "The Myth of the Perfect Parent" discussed the sense many religious parents have that they've failed if their child strays from the church. Given this backdrop and the wider cultural messages about parenting, one wonders how these evangelical adoptive parents overcome their own desire for control, bring a stranger into their home, and then take responsibility for raising him.

The most persuasive explanation comes from the author of that article, Leslie Leyland Fields, who exhorts her readers: "We are not sovereign over our children—only God is. Children are not tomatoes to stake out or mules to train, nor are they numbers to plug into an equation. They are full human beings wondrously and fearfully made. Parenting, like all tasks under the sun, is intended as an endeavor of love, risk, perseverance, and, above all, faith."

Ms. Riley is an affiliate scholar at the Institute for American Values.




The second resource is a 7 minute video put together by Todd and Jill Talley made for use by the adoption agency they went through in adopting their Daniel from Ethiopia.



Adoption Advocates International encourages each of the families adopting through their agency to give back and do something to spread the word about adoption and the plight of the orphan. The Talleys took that request seriously. One of the primary goals of this video is to communicate the need to find homes for older orphans. And while the intent of the video is to promote Ethiopian adoption in particular, this goal of promoting the adoption of orphans, esp. older ones, is one that our Grace Adoption and Foster Care Team is looking to encourage, regardless of whether it is through international channels, foster care, foster adoption or private domestic adoption.

The next two Sundays, November 7 and 14, during the 10:45 hour in the Founder's Hall, the Grace Adoption & Foster Care Team is hosting a pair courses for those interested.

November 7 will focus Foster Care, Foster Adoption

November 14 will focus on International Adoption
I've been encouraged by the many in our church who have responded to the call to adoption. I'm praying that God will stir the hearts of others.

10 comments:

Penny Malley said...

"We are not sovereign over our children—only God is. Children are not tomatoes to stake out or mules to train, nor are they numbers to plug into an equation. They are full human beings wondrously and fearfully made. Parenting, like all tasks under the sun, is intended as an endeavor of love, risk, perseverance, and, above all, faith."

Love that quote. Love, love, love it.

Kevin Heldt said...

Great video Todd and Jill! And I spotted one of our new daughters in it! So fun!!!

Brianna Heldt said...

Yay Todd and Jill! So great seeing AAI and Layla House in the spotlight, and of course like Kevin said, SO sweet seeing our little girl in the video!

How wonderful that you are having these seminars. Adoption is hard, but it is BLESSED. And there is such a HUGE need for adoptive families because so many children are waiting. Hoping you all have a big turnout, and wishing I was there to attend!

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