Thursday, March 30, 2006

Friday Fun . . . . Store Wars

There's been a couple of folks who've been asking me to address more environmental issues from the pulpit. I actually think the Bible does speak to this issue. Way back in the "Heaven" series, I developed this some. When we come across relevant texts, I'll be sure and tackle it. In the meantime enjoy this. . .

Store Wars

My kids just watched Star Wars for the first time on our trip to Shaver Lake a few weeks back, so they just loved this. They laughed and laughed. Your kids will love it, too.

8 comments:

Tim Weaver said...

Someone had WAY too much time on their hands. That was hilarious and very well done.

The Bible definitely addresses our stewardship of the creation (just like our bodies, time, and money). To me the great question/debate is where the line is between being a good steward of what God has given to man to subdue, use, and rule and worshipping the creation and holding man hostage so that the creation rules over us.

Andy Gibson said...

Hmmm.....there wasn't a message in that video!

Lisa and Colin Lewis said...

Store Wars is a great video! Our family had seen it a couple of years ago, but coupled with having recently seen "Super-size Me" there is definitely a message of stewardship to be considered. We saw the documentary on Sunday evening, had a family meeting and have sworn off fast food. Not only that but the next morning at my chiropractor's office I ran across a pamphlet for a local farm who sells and delivers shares of their crop for the 32 week season. If anyone wants to check it out here is the link www.huasnavalleyfarm.com

Andy Gibson said...

Be careful of movies like Super Size Me. It is obvious this guy is intentionally going too far to make his point:

http://www2.jsonline.com/news/editorials/may04/231383.asp?format=print

"Through his antics, Spurlock sends precisely the wrong message. He absolves us of responsibility for our own fitness. We aren't to blame for being fat; big corporations are. And the remedy, he suggests, is to file lawsuits and plead with the Nancy State and the Food Police for protection."

It's called personal responsibility and this country has little of it.

Unfortunately, just like the George Mason Patriots and Hybrid vehicles (which are engineering wise pointless and a fiscal waste of money, and I can give plenty of support), there is a bandwagon behind organic foods and they are tainted by movies like Super Size Me. Personally for me, it turns me off to organic foods. I will admit, if you do eat organic foods, regardless of the band wagon, thank you, because there is an element of you taking care of yourself and being personally (and spiritually) responsible to what God gave you. Just make sure you know exactly what you are doing from an global economic perspective and a logistics perspective, not because of the banner you see in the Organic Food stores:

http://www.slate.com/id/2138176/

And please, please don't do it because of some movie.

Anonymous said...

I think it is important to be good to the environment (since it is part of God's creation!). God says that He reveals Himself in that creation... which is partially what first brought me to the reality of God in the first place. If we don't take care of the earth, perhaps future generations won't be able to see Him that easily (just like when people pollute any good gift from God -- like intimacy for example). In the beginning, God basically gave us organic food. It wasn't over processed. Wasn't covered in pesticides. He wanted to nourish us with good food from the earth. I’m not saying we should put ALL our focus on the environment instead of the souls of those around us. I’m not saying we should all eat ONLY organic food. I just don’t understand why most Christians look down on helping the environment so much.

Andy Gibson said...

Anon, what makes you feel like Christians look down on the environment?

Kevin Heldt said...

Andy, I definitely get the vibe that a lot of people see something contradictory between caring about the environment and being a Christian. I think it has to do with the political polarizations that take place. Because of some extreme views at either side of the spectrum, Christians err on the side of not caring about the environment lest we be lumped in with "them." The Christian should avoid both errors: God calls us to care for His creation so we shouldn't haphazardly thrash it, but He also calls us to care for His creatures so we shouldn't shy away from using our natural resources to help people.

Also, that was an interesting article that you referenced. I agree that if you eat a lot of anything and don't move, you'll gain weight. But I don't buy the point the article was making about how it really only comes down to the amount of calories you take in compared to how much you exercise. I realize you need to take in mass to add mass (though I've had some interesting conversations with people who don't believe it) but from my limited knowledge of nutrition, it seems safe to assume that it WILL make a difference whether you have 2500 calories of a balanced diet vs. 2500 calories of Twinkies. Would anyone really argue that fast food is not very good for you? And I can say this because I happen to love the stuff, but I don't eat it very often because I usually don't feel very good afterwards (and because it just seems so obvious while you're eating it that it's not good for you).

So sure the guy took an atypical case to prove a point but that's okay. I would sincerely doubt that he would have had the same results even with overeating and no exercise, had he eaten 5 or 6 thousand calories of balanced home-cooking. In which case his point is decently made. Now does that mean we should get mad at and sue McDonald's. Of course not. They don't force anyone to eat their product. Should they be honest about the nutrional content of their food? Yes. Do they exaggerate the healthiness of their foods in their advertising? Possibly -- and there things get a little gray when you throw in the marketing. We shouldn't expect them to run commercials with the tagline: Eat our food -- It'll give you a gutache.

But again, I'm no nutrionist. Anyone out there who is and who would care to clarify or expound?

(Yikes, that was a long post...okay, I'll go away again for another month.)

Anonymous said...

Matt Lyons says...

It was kind of funny. I liked the melon of death exploding. I also like all of the funny names.

May the Farm be with you always.